Pottery Ribs

Available in a multitude of shapes and sizes, ribs are great tools for both wheel throwing and handbuilding. Every rib has its place: from a hard wood or plastic rib for compressing a rolled out slab, to softer ribs that assist achieving shapes that might otherwise be near impossible. And let's not forget our friend the metal rib, which, among other uses, is phenomenal at easily hand sanding off glaze drips...

Note: one rib, RB4, is being sold; Photo incorrectly shows multiple ribs.

Potter's Wood Rib (RB4)

Can not say enough good about this wood rib, in finished hardwood. A complete asset for compressing clay, shaping the inside of large bowls and working on slabs. The Kemper RB6 (not available with this link) wooden rib is also helpful for shaping rims on the wheel, and when hand-building bowls.

Sherrill Mudtools Polymer Rib, Very Soft

If you haven't thrown with one of these yet, you're in for a new experience. It takes a little getting used to, particularly as you move from the sidewall to the bottom of the piece, but once mastered, you can achieve extremely refined shapes and curves.

Kemper Finish Rubbers (3 1/8 in, small soft)

These Kemper ribs have been around forever and last as long. Excellent for both throwing, and smoothing slabs. The hard version (usually in black) is a favorite for slab building and compressing slabs just after roll-out. We own all 4 of these Kemper ribs for many years, and they're like-new: soft (blue) and hard (black) small and large ribs.

Sherrill Mudtools Stainless Steel Rib Tool

A metal rib is another essential for all pottery seasons! Takes a bit of experience to use on the wheel (so you don't cut into a wall), but they have amazing flex while simultaneously supporting, facilitating contouring and shaping.

We've not tried this particular metal rib. Decades later, the one that came in the Kemper starter kit rocks on!

Wood Potters Ribs for Pottery/Sculpting

This highly affordable set of wood tools is a toolbox plus. Picked up this set at a craft store years ago, and use it constantly. The elongated tool with teeth is great for adding texture, and the tapered end is good for trimming excess clay off the bottom sides of pots just before undercutting. The rest are helpful in handbuilding; the only one not used much is the tear drop shaped one. We do likey these muchy!